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What does a website cost...?

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One of the many questions we get asked time and time again here at WDF is "How much should i charge for so and so?".

 

Every single time the answers come back from our regular members "How long is a piece of string", "depends on such and such", "to many variable" and on and on.

 

The following links may help you identify what a website should cost. There may be no definite answer but they should help you on your way!

 

http://whatdoesawebsitecost.co.uk/

https://www.websitebuilderexpert.com/how-much-should-a-website-cost/

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One of the many questions we get asked time and time again here at WDF is "How much should i charge for so and so?".

 

Every single time the answers come back from our regular members "How long is a piece of string", "depends on such and such", "to many variable" and on and on.

 

Smashing magazine posted this link earlier and i found it to be quite interesting.

 

Again it gives no definitive answer (as well all know there isn't one) but it does give a few interesting points to factor in to the pricing of a website and may help those who are struggling with the task.

 

http://whatdoesawebsitecost.co.uk/

Nice link, sure it will be of some help to people :)

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This topic should be sticky,.

+1 to karma

 

Haha yeah we'll see how many people vote it in!

 

It's actually been pretty handy for me today. It's nice to know that i've been doing it right all this time and not just being particularly difficult with clients :p

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Getting clients to see things this way is another matter entirely!!

 

 

I don't have a problem with normal clients understanding this. This link is more for those designers/developers new and old who need a little poke in the right direction when trying to price a site.

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Personally, I've never replied on other sites to give me an idea on how much I should charge for web services. I go with the times and base my pricing on how much knowledge I have on something, the economy and so on.

 

Look at it this way... if you are 35 years old and support you and your family, is a website that will take you two months to develop really worth $300? This should be the general thought for all of us in this industry. It has done me very well for years.

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Price varies from different companies. It is not necessary to have one price....

 

 

Genius. Is this the best that Pakistan can offer? Don't say you're from New York when you're not. Don't post crap on the forum. Goodbye.

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Genius. Is this the best that Pakistan can offer? Don't say you're from New York when you're not. Don't post crap on the forum. Goodbye.

 

I'm the lead manager of a company in New York, and i've been having the same issue. We have basic prices, but we are always finding this reason or that to change the quote. What I always tell prospective clients is that building a website is like building a house. You may have an idea of what you want, a budget allocated, but in the end it's always a little more for the unexpected.

 

You start with a wireframe, which is similar to the blueprint (that's what we call building plans in the states), and you go from there. Then you need to decide what technology you want to build, php, .net, etc., and that's kinda like the foundation. You design the home page, and that's similar to those pictures of finished buildings you always see. Then the real work begins. Changes keep coming, and your price depends on whether you want marble flooring (flash design), wordpress- efficient simple flooring, or parquet made up of little pieces (e-commerce). In the end, the price is reflected by the quality, and features you want and agree on.

 

My basic pricing is $4,000 for e-commerce (magento standard), $350 for logos (5 samples+2 revisions) and informational sites begin at roughly $1200. All USD.

Edited by zed
remove spammy links

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but we are always finding this reason or that to change the quote.

 

Although your post in itself seems a little spammy, you raise a point here which I'd like to ask about:

 

When we use builders or car mechanics, we get an "estimate" rather than a quote. How come in our trade we have to give a quote and then stick to it, even if the job presents unforseen technical problems?

 

Take your car to a garage, and if they find they have to do loads of extra stuff to achieve your job, they will notify you of an increase in "estimate". The point being that, just like in our trade, we can't always know what's involved fully in a job until we actually get halfway through it.

 

So my question is : In our trade, do you think we'd be better off giving "estimates" rather than "quotes", to avoid landing ourselves with some ringer that hardly pays? A note at the bottom of our proposal maybe to state that estimates could vary by "up to 20%" etc. depending on unforseen technical problems?

 

I know usually we talk about building these in to the quote, but surely this makes the quote higher than it should be? What if there aren't any problems, do we then give the client a discount? Also, if we quote too high, the client doesn't want to use us.

 

Thoughts?

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"How long is a piece of a string?"

 

I can easily answer that..

 

Its the same length from the middle to the end, as it is from the beginning to the middle.

 

:D

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Although your post in itself seems a little spammy, you raise a point here which I'd like to ask about:

 

When we use builders or car mechanics, we get an "estimate" rather than a quote. How come in our trade we have to give a quote and then stick to it, even if the job presents unforseen technical problems?

 

Take your car to a garage, and if they find they have to do loads of extra stuff to achieve your job, they will notify you of an increase in "estimate". The point being that, just like in our trade, we can't always know what's involved fully in a job until we actually get halfway through it.

 

So my question is : In our trade, do you think we'd be better off giving "estimates" rather than "quotes", to avoid landing ourselves with some ringer that hardly pays? A note at the bottom of our proposal maybe to state that estimates could vary by "up to 20%" etc. depending on unforseen technical problems?

 

I know usually we talk about building these in to the quote, but surely this makes the quote higher than it should be? What if there aren't any problems, do we then give the client a discount? Also, if we quote too high, the client doesn't want to use us.

 

Thoughts?

 

First off, sorry about the spam thing. I'm a little new here, and never realized it would be a huge deal to post some links to my site so that a'll can see the kind of work I do.

 

Truth is, that's a great argument. Why should we be any different, and I agree. The only difference I see is when my car breaks down, and I know **** about fixing cars, I am twisted to go to a mechanic. we are not buying something, or having something made for us, instead we are having something repaired. The mechanic begins to look, gives you a rough estimate, and somehow always manages to come back with some major extras, at least in NYC.

 

Here we are professional designers and developers. A client expects us to go through all the options, ideas, plans, etc. We explain the technical sides to the best of our ability, and then we move towards sealing the deal. Granted, clients can change their minds, but the gist is that they expect us to complete their plan.

 

However, many of my friends do insert into the contract a hourly rate for any extras, which does not fall into the scope. In this case, it becomes more like an estimate than a contractual quote.

 

But I guess you are right, and this doesn't really answer your question. :p

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Snipage

 

As posted above.

If i'm called in to 'fix' a broken site then it is an estimate.

If i'm contracted to build a site from scratch then it's a quote but it's a quote based on the information at hand. The contract includes and hourly rate for anything above and beyond what is set out in the contract.

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First off, sorry about the spam thing. I'm a little new here, and never realized it would be a huge deal to post some links to my site so that a'll can see the kind of work I do.

 

Nah no probs, it just looks like that when people post it inline in their posts repeatedly. We're so used to spammers doing that here.

Usual kind of "etiquette" I guess is to make good use of your sig in your footer for it ;) - assuming there's no post limit on doing a sig? Dunno, haven't done one myself.

 

To you and Mike - ok, yeah I agree. I would sum it up by saying if you're going to be working with anyone else's work, you have to be quite careful in my experience in quoting, because you never know what horrors are waiting down the line. An immediate example I can think of is PSD to HTML. Even if you spend some time looking at the PSD's, I've still been tripped up by some horrors which meant I ended up effectively out of pocket because they added an unforseen 1/3 or 1/4 time to the project.

 

Thinking about it, you two are correct - all the projects I've ever taken care of solely I've not had that much of a problem with this issue.

 

Working with other people's work = estimate.

Working solely = quote.

 

Perhaps?

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Working with other people's work = estimate.

Working solely = quote.

 

Perhaps?

 

Ditto!

 

FYI, I didn't add to sig because they did have a post limit. I'm not very into forums, used to be more into it when I was in the mobile hacking / flashing scheme. today, just a little too busy.

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If you count up the hours you work on a job and then workout your actual hourly rate against what you've charged the client, you've at least got an eye on your rate when you quote. Now factor in how many actual paid hours you work by deducting all the non-paid hours you put into marketing, training etc. Now add up your costs; software, electricity, travel costs etc and factor those in as well.

 

If you're not doing more than one website a week (if you are doing more than one a week then you might want to look at the quality of your work) and you are still only charging £250 per 5 page site, consider that you might be better off working checkout in Tescos.

Edited by bikeman

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The best method we've found is to create a complete project breakdown of stages and tasks within, not just a top-level schedule.

 

From there we can track and apply the time quoted against the actual time taken and per task on a granular level.

 

From the information gathered over a period of time you can produce a number of charts that track and report your under/over spend for the time spent against the time quoted in the proposal.

 

Yes it adds an extra level of management but you factor that in to your proposal, but by spending the extra time you considerably limit the potential for under quoting a project.

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Every company has different crietria of cost of website. Price is not fixed. And cost of webiste depend upon on number of pages, scripts, content etc.

Hope you agree with my point.

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It takes me ages to write a quote and at the end, the scope of work is watertight. In my quotes, I make it very clear that if something crops up during development that is out of scope, then I will be happy to give them a further estimate for the extra work needed. Works for me.

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I agree with MM Media that a step by step process will provide you with the information you need to provide in a quote. However it also depends on the questions you ask and answers the client provides.

 

In my quotes, i ask the client key questions and do a project plan in how i see this happening and provide the breakdown to the client with quote.

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Its varies from site to site means; site style, no of pages, content, site structure etc. So we can't say fixed price for a site have same no of pages.

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Although your post in itself seems a little spammy, you raise a point here which I'd like to ask about:

 

When we use builders or car mechanics, we get an "estimate" rather than a quote. How come in our trade we have to give a quote and then stick to it, even if the job presents unforseen technical problems?

 

Take your car to a garage, and if they find they have to do loads of extra stuff to achieve your job, they will notify you of an increase in "estimate". The point being that, just like in our trade, we can't always know what's involved fully in a job until we actually get halfway through it.

 

So my question is : In our trade, do you think we'd be better off giving "estimates" rather than "quotes", to avoid landing ourselves with some ringer that hardly pays? A note at the bottom of our proposal maybe to state that estimates could vary by "up to 20%" etc. depending on unforseen technical problems?

 

I know usually we talk about building these in to the quote, but surely this makes the quote higher than it should be? What if there aren't any problems, do we then give the client a discount? Also, if we quote too high, the client doesn't want to use us.

 

Thoughts?

 

Simple answer is that big companies are using quotes, they have cleverly written T's and C's that allow them to up the anti when things go awry. Small companies tend to follow suit but don't have the fancy pants layers to write their T's and C's for them and so have to take losses on the chin.

 

The smart answer is to write your quote out carefully, stating exactly what this set price is for, use a foot notes section to outline some 'examples' of situations that may cause the price to vary, state that you 'will inform the customer before any price changes occur' and stick to it carefully. Always be resolute, it is better to walk away with your head held high than go bankrupt!

 

Or use an estimate system, and make sure your tender documents are clearly marked 'Estimate'. Then add 'An Outline of Included Items/services' and a similar foot notes section.

 

Either method will give you the ability to operate without having to take reasonable unforeseen cost's at your own expense, but don't think your writing a blank check for yourself. Being taken to court is expensive!

 

As to how much should you charge.

 

Start with what you would like to be paid for the hours you expect to spend working on it, add the cost of any subscriptions, software, licensing, labour for outside work etc, then add a reasonable percentage for extra time you did not predict, and a further percentage as your 'company profit margin'. The profit margin would normally be ( 20% to 25% of ( all cost's foreseen ) + ( Allowance for taxation, and unforeseeable cost's ) ). This is the basis of how costing works for all industries. Some will add a much higher standard profit margin than others though, and can be as much as 55%

 

EDIT

 

If your quote is 'reasonable and justifiable' in your eye's and a client say's it's to much walk away they are not realistic and probably a risk of being a bad payer. That's something you don't want!

Edited by Weedy101

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This is a debatable issue. Some companies charge according to the functionality of the website. Generally static websites are cheaper whereas websites with shopping carts integrated in it costs high.

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This is quite interesting, I didn't know that a website would cost like that. This gives me knowledge to it. Thanks :)

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Nice link very helpful.

Even though I am now working in a company I still accept freelance jobs and am no longer sure how much I should charge for what

since the company I am working for pays me per hour for everything I am doing.

So thanks

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