Jump to content
Ciwan

Cost of an eCommerce website Design (No Code)

Recommended Posts

Eh?

 

That's exactly what I been doing and saying for years. Get the content sorted and then wrap the most suitable theme round the outside.

 

You keep using the words 'pre-made theme'. I suggest using an off-the shelf theme and then configuring it. Try using Genesis with a Child theme. You can make it look like anything you like.

 

Same with Woo-commerce. It's a complicated beast that needs all sorts of back end scripting and coding. What happens at the front end is up to you. So go get a themer that is close to the layout you want and adapt it.

 

The article you linked to is wildly out of date. None of that applies to modern themes - many of which allow you complete flexibility.

Edited by fisicx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have little doubt that a custom theme for the brand I'm trying to build is better. What I am saying is, given that I am just starting out with zero customers, I have no data about my customers, I can't run surveys on them ..etc

 

I think right now it would be better to start with a good theme, once I have a good flow of customers, I can then probe their desires and dislikes and know about their location and age group through Analytics, then I can make a more informed decision on the custom design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you missed what I was saying, you can't 'wrap' a theme around the content, you should be creating the content and then designing around that.

 

The person that made the theme, they do not know what message you need to convey, they do not know if it is suitable for your clients businesses needs, colour, form, style and emotion all matter to the overall look and feel of the site, when I visit a business website, I like to get a feel for who or what the business is or does.

 

Let's take a website like apples one, when you visit it, you get this feeling of a crisp polished site, you can easily connect that site with the rest of their business, it is just simply obvious that the website belongs to them as it matches their whole look and feel because it is purpose built to fulfil their needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you missed what I was saying, you can't 'wrap' a theme around the content, you should be creating the content and then designing around that.

I agree.

 

But if you choose the right theme it will convey the right message.

 

I disagree about the Apple website. I don't like it at all. The navigation is dreadful and the support pages aren't easy to use. It's a clear case of style over substance. You say it meets their needs. That's wrong, i should meet the needs of their customers.

Edited by fisicx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pre Built themes have come a long way since 10 years ago and there are 1000s to choose from. Picking one most likely won't convey your message 100%, but as a start I'll be happy with 80% of the message being conveyed, which I think is doable with the right theme.

Edited by Ciwan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i actually am talking about that, their needs to the client but when we talk about (how you put it) the needs of the client and the needs to the business, we actually define that by saying needs and wants

 

One of the issues people usually have is the confusion between needs and wants, if you have a business and want to go online, that is a want, the needs come in when you have assessed the business and figured out why they need a website.

 

With what you say about apples website, what you are talking about there is the ui (user interface) or the ux(user experience) not the design of the site, the design fulfils their needs even if the site is not a great user experience, it fulfils their needs because it gives the right impression to its users, we know it belongs to Apple, little clues like fonts, style, structure colours etc all follow their branding guidelines and therefore I know I am on apples website (although less so these days because many have copied parts of it).

 

Choosing a pre made theme could never tie in the business with the website, sure, you could use your own font, colours and imagery but even then there would always be a disconnect between the website and the business.

 

Here are some of googles branding guidelines https://developers.google.com/+/branding-guidelines?hl=en now unless these rules are followed, you could cause confusion to the user.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Choosing a pre made theme could never tie in the business with the website, sure, you could use your own font, colours and imagery but even then there would always be a disconnect between the website and the business.

Not if you choose the right theme. You can fully brand and connect a site with a business, conveying the right message with an off the shelf theme. Your Acrodesign for example could easily be ported to a standard theme - I know of two that already pretty much match your design. Create a child theme and build the CSS and its all done. Probably less than a day's work.

 

Still disagree with you about the Apple site. If I want help with my phone don't care about all that branding, I just want an answer to my question. You are viewing the site with your design head on. I'm looking at the site with my 'I need help' head on.

Edited by fisicx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      58,574
    • Most Online
      4,970

    Newest Member
    David Rodriguez
    Joined
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      65,793
    • Total Posts
      453,274
×