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how do you learn?


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#1 paul81

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Posted 31 July 2016 - 05:18 PM

Hi all!  :)

 

So, like the title suggests, i'm interested in how people keep up to date with all the ongoing updates with the world of web design/development...

 

As i'm learning the development side via video tutorials, (through Treehouse) i'm finding my attention seems to wander, sometimes wishing they would hurry up and get to the point, then just wishing there was transcript to just read through, as i can read something probably 2 or 3 times over, in the time a certain video would have played....

 

Sorry.... slight rant there (no disrespect to T/H mean, i guess its just down to personal preference with these things)

 

So, over to you lovely folk. Whats your preferred poison?

 

 

 

 

Side note: if anyone would like to recommend some good reading material (either eBooks, or webpages) for learning development, well that would be just fine and dandy  :good:



#2 fisicx

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 06:04 AM

I read. I don't find videos of any real value as I like to go back over material to ensure it sticks (note: this is key to retention - multiple impressions are necessary if you want to remember stuff).

 

I get the material from various sources, it really all depends on what I want to do.



#3 wpexpert

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 10:59 AM

As a WordPress expert, I subscribe to RSS feed with Feedly app. I can read it online, on my MAC or iPad. I may have 10 differents feeds but not more because it will be too much to keep up. I find it the best way to keep up with my peers and industry. I subscribe to different kinds of information like security, design, themes, plugins... etc. Also, as an entrepreneur, I have few feeds as well about it. I like short video and Udemy is good for that. 



#4 rbrtsmith

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 12:07 PM

I find videos work really well for me. I can watch them multiple times.
As for keeping up I follow many of the industry 'celebs' so to speak and participate in their discussions, review upcoming courses and work - right now I am providing feedback for an upcoming React/Redux/Immutable course and building up a rapport with the author.
I find this helps keep me ahead of the game along with reading books by well known gurus. Like for JavaScript you can't go far wrong with stuff written by Doug Crockford, Kyle Simpson. For CSS check out Harry Roberts.

This also alows me to automatically filter out much of the noise and misinformation - there is a lot of it in this industry and choosing where and who to learn from is really important. There's a lot of self perscribed experts and a good proportion of them give out really poor advice which can be difficult for a beginner to spot.

Edited by rbrtsmith, 01 August 2016 - 12:12 PM.


#5 Lyndsey

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 12:35 PM

I learn by doing. I think of a project that will use the technologies I want to learn and get stuck in, using the web as a reference along the way.



#6 rbrtsmith

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 02:08 PM

I learn by doing. I think of a project that will use the technologies I want to learn and get stuck in, using the web as a reference along the way.


This too how could I forget! It's all well and good knowing the theory but you have to learn how to apply it in real projects!


#7 citypaul

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 02:53 PM

I personally use a combination of books, online resources like video courses etc, and of course actually building things. I can't really learn by just reading or watching a video - I have to put it into practice.



#8 andy9l

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 05:09 PM

I learn by doing. I think of a project that will use the technologies I want to learn and get stuck in, using the web as a reference along the way.


Every time.

I'm currently getting back into Javascript...and I started off by writing two single-purpose scripts using ES6, which is (sort of) new to me. From this process I've learned a lot about npm and a whole host of available packages, compilers, task runners, you name it.

A recent evening of "learning" for me involved:

- Lazy load image plugin would be simple, let's do it
- Alright I need to compile my first line of ES6 to ES5 - Google it
- Find Babel, need a task runner - Google it
- Find Gulp and Grunt - Google them
- Read docs/intro for each - Google for opinions
- Find latest posts actually recommend against both, just use npm scripts - Google it
- Much better, decide on using npm scripts - Back to Googling Babel
- Read Babel docs, read opinions on Babel
- Implement using npm scripts, need CLI syntax - Google it
- Find CLI commands on Github - Google what each flag means
- Write my own CLI commands, need a watcher - Google it
- Find like 5 watch options, Google them

...and so on

I just go down rabbit holes for almost every detail until I understand it. I never, ever "just install X", nor am I ever satisfied with copy + paste = done. You'll never learn that way.

I want to try/learn Jekyll. Started last night and still only just have Jekyll installed (not even a site directory yet). I looked into various Ruby package managers, why Apple increased security on /usr/, what /usr/local is for, opinions on Jekyll setups, the list goes on...

My own curiosity makes me learn.

Edited by andy9l, 01 August 2016 - 05:10 PM.


#9 BlueDreamer

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Posted 01 August 2016 - 05:36 PM

I learn by doing. I think of a project that will use the technologies I want to learn and get stuck in, using the web as a reference along the way.

 

This ^

 

Play, test, make mistakes, learn how to fix the mistakes.



#10 patrickhaye

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 01:28 PM

My way of learning is simply to get stuck in, as you learn more from making mistakes then you do reading boring books or listening to an annoying voice on a youtube video.

 

Creating a compete train wreck of a website, returning to that website and picking it apart to see what has caused issues, means (for me anyway) that I learn how to avoid these issues in future.

 

I also keep previous sites and compare each site to my updated site, which shows the progression and I look at my original design, embarrassed that I thought It was decent!



#11 paul81

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Posted 18 August 2016 - 07:50 PM

I suppose the 'by doing it' is the obvious answer, but i was wondering about how you got the theory behind what your about to start playing with





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